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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 102
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)
. >> the owner of a michigan construction co., preceded by a union member who works at a general motors plant. michigan gov. rick sanders signed legislation -- rick snyder right to work legislation into law. the president said that what they're talking about is giving you the right to work for less money. a right to work at state, michigan? >> it is incredible. the republican legislature has passed this. there are two institutions that greeted the middle class in america with of the 10 states with the highest per capita income, although one is a non- right to work state. the 10 states with the highest medical coverage for the workers, eight of the 10 are not right to work states. where workers have the right to organize and unions, and those can be effective marketing, it raises the level of living for all americans. that, frankly, the fastest- growing states -- three of the 20 are right to work states. that puts that to rest. it is a chance to destroy unions, undermined unions, or hurt them politically. no accidents, the " brother -- koch brothers finance to this. >> it worked great when the
to gwen. >> ifill: michigan, home to the united auto workers and one of the most heavily unionized states in the country, is suddenly ground zero in the national debate over workers' rights, as the republican lawmakers who control the state's legislature prepare to cast a vote tomorrow that could permanently alter the political landscape. >> ifill: hundreds of people descended on the state capitol building in lansing last week to protest a move to make michigan a right-to-work state. republicans running the state house and senate have approved a pair of bills to allow workers to hold union jobs without joining the union. organized labor was furious. >> you will have people that will be working right ale long side of you that will not have to pay union dues but you pay union dues but will still be able to get all the benefits from being a union member. >> ifill: democrats in the legislature complained that republicans rammed through the bill with no hearings or public comments. >> this is a travesty. they're pushing this at the 11th hour because they know that the public doesn't want it. >
. the relatively small clerical workers' union fear their jobs are at risk. they are union back jobs and well-paid. they have been supported by members of a sister union. the effect is to bring the sprawling complex to a standstill. it accounts for more than one- third of the imports into the united states. >> if i am a small business woman in ohio, why should i worry about this strike? >> quite simply, the fear is is if this is allowed to carry on, there will be a shortage of goods and a hold up of the vessels that are languishing behind me. they are just hanging around and not being processed, they are not getting to the stores and the shortage could push up prices ahead of the christmas shopping period. >> everybody will be watching. thank you for joining me. still to come on tonight's program. it is the presidency being watched around the world. prince william joye and his wife -- joins his wife kate in hospital. we will bring me the latest. a powerful typhoon has been battering the philippines. dozens of deaths are reported and more than a 50,000 have been forced to flee their homes. a r
international says greece's handling of illegal migrants make it and i were the member of the european union. a senior official at the ministry told the bbc every year around 130,000 people are arrested when they enter the country illegally. we have more in this report. >> greece is a major gateway for migrants from asian and african countries trying to enter the european union. that they are discriminated against is not new but what this report is saying is that the mistreatment they are suffering now is reaching crisis levels. thousands are detained in an appalling conditions or left vulnerable in the streets where racist attacks happened on it almost daily basis. greece is at the front line of the migration challenge. more than 80% of migrants into into the european union and they do go through greece. thousands end up in detention camps and many of those who are not detained spent days and nights waiting to apply for asylum. other recent months, there has been a wave of attacks on immigrants, a number of them being stabbed to death. it is not just the illegal migrants or asylum seekers f
the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release
in the response to a decision not to fly the union flag. here is our correspondent mark simpson. >> there has been trouble in the center again tonight. tension has been simmering in parts of northern island all week, with more than 20 police officers injured. this clash was quickly brought under control but it was another dangerous situation. it is not the image of belfast politicians wanted on the day hillary clinton came to visit. she has been here seven times before and knows that the peace process is not perfect. she has a message for those causing trouble on the streets. >> you must not use violence as a means of expressing those feelings. the only path forward is a peaceful, democratic one. >> nasa -- last night in london, police found a rocket launcher ready for use by dissident republicans. loyalists have been on the streets protesting about the decision by belfast to stop flying the union flag every day. death threats have been issued because her party supported the flag decision. after meeting hillary clinton, she spoke about the fear of being attacked. >> i will not let the decisions --
viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: michigan, a state considered a cradle of the union movement, today struck a blow against organized labor. the republican-dominated state legislature approved laws that deny unions the right to require membership in exchange for a job. more than 12,000 people gathered outside the state capitol in lansing to protest the move. inside, they chanted "shame on you!" at republican governor rick snyder. late today he signed the bill. for more, we're joined by micheline maynard, a contributor to forbes.com and former detroit bureau chief for the "new york times," and by bill ballenger, editor of "inside michigan politics." welcome to you both. mickey maynard. first, this has all happened very quickly. what precipitated this right now. >> there were two things that happened, judy. first of all in november there was a ballot proposal that unions floated that would have outlawed right-to-work. it would have put that into the state constitution. that proposal failed because it was proposed at the same time as a lot of constitutional amendments. people just
of china and the soviet union to demonstrate long-range ballistic missile technology, and it is a country that has a horrible proliferation record. this is not just a problem associated with north korean on the peninsula. it has broader ramifications. >> thank you for coming in. very interesting. russian president vladimir putin has warned against foreign intervention in russian politics a. in its first speech to parliament, he also said russia needed to reverse its population decline or fall apart. daniel sandford reports. [speaking russian] >> showing few signs of recent back problems, vladimir putin strolled into one of the great halls of the kremlin for a speech that cements a new era of his leadership, and he suggests head upon the need to address russian population decline, a loss of more than 7 million people in just 20 years. >> of russia wants to be sovereign and power, there needs to be more of us, and we need to be better. >> this has been a difficult year for him with hundred thousand -- with hundreds of thousands of protesters taking to the streets to challenge his leadership
fledged banking union and bailout loans for greece. what was being done to prevent another global downturn? that was on queen elizabeth's mind as she visited the bank of england. >> trying her hand at high finance, the queen, put in her signature on a special, a bank note. >> it does not improve much. >> the bank note, worth 1 million pounds, seem like small change as the queen and duke of edinburgh were shown the vaults were gold reserves were kept. there are 27 billion pounds of gold in this fault alone. that is not something you see every day, even when you have been doing this sort of thing for 60 years. has the tour went on, talk turned to more serious matters. the queen once asked why nobody had seen the financial crisis coming. officials launched into a three- part lecture on what caused the crisis. the words like "paradigm" flew across the floor. both the duke and the queen listened intently. finally, it became a two-way conversation, and the queen offered a few thoughts of her own. first, a question about the bankers. >> complacency. >> and then a question about the regulator, the
by the european union, which the military government finally permitted once the scale of the disaster became clear. the great rivers that cut through this delta fly right alongside the village -- a lot right alongside the villages where most inhabitants live, and the wall of water pushed by the cyclone simply surged over year, smashing aside these houses and the people living in them. even 4.5 years later with all the help they are getting, they are still recovering. a simple clay stove, but now they have been taught to improve its design so that it uses much less fuel, and they can make money selling them to other villages. it cuts the cost of firewood and reduce it -- and improves the filling of mangrove trees, which cut care -- which can help protect against future cyclones. population village's died. it still proving a hard road back even to the very basic lives they had before. >> i lost everything. i had to hire machines to work my field. the quality was not always good. >> one of the projects funded by the eu is trying to test strains of rice to see which will produce the best crops in the
, germany, the u.s., of course, even the soviet union. >> -- tavis: that is my point. everybody seems to be guilty of that over the course of history. i am glad you took a question. what does africa have today that the rest of the world does not prove >> -- does not? >> some possibilities. some structures of spirituality, and i emphasize that, spirituality which is not aggressive. decimating a culture, which christianity is guilty of. islam is guilty of. a tolerant spirituality. in the new world, in brazil, where african religions co have it and become -- where they cohabit. this is a lesson for some of the so-called world religions. they have taken joy in decimating humanity tavis: -- and decimating humanity. tavis: i raise this question. just like china, the world power now advancing in africa, the catholic church has found africa is a place that is very fertile. what say you about the catholic church all of that continent? they are getting new converts daily, hourly. >> a bit more selectivity or control. who is going to argue about the ultimate fundamental? you have a contest for t
for the department? >> well, what this agreement involves is an agreement between the police union, the city and professors attorneys who filed this original civil rights lawsuit. what they've decided on is creating a compliance director. now, this would be a quasi mayor of oakland in a sense in that he gets to -- he or she would have the power to fire the police chief with the court approval. they would have the power to direct the city administrators. those are two things currently only the mayor has. it's limited in scope in that it would only effect the reform tasks that are incomplete for the police department. the city had been very concerned that this potential receiver, or federal receiver, would have oversight over the entire police department. so all -- so all three sides involved in this are very happy. >> and this whole situation stems from the riders case. remind us, again, what that was. that was a police brutality case. >> yeah. there were some officers who were accused of framing suspects and in the wake of that, there was millions of dollars paid out in civil lawsuits, but a
. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city for a speech at the manhattan institute. >> i did that last night and had some meetings on wall street, seeing them there later. >> rose: so what's your message about the british economy to manhattan institute as well as the mayor and wall street? >> well, the basic message is britain is open for business. if you want to come and invest in a country that is dealing with its problems, cutting its business taxes, providing opportunities for companys to go britain is the place. i think we're doing better. >> rose: you do? >> i certainly do. >> rose: the numbers don't look like that. >> well, actually, look at the u.k.
think one reason for this is the decline of labor unions. it used to be that when the union movement was much bigger and more powerful, and especially when private sector workers dominated the union movement, the afl-cio sort of looked out for the working class. they looked out for all workers, not just union workers. they understood that a healthy working class having lots of jobs was ultimately to the benefit of their members. and i think the decline in power of the unions and now and the fact that public sector unions now dominate the afl-cio is a key reason for that. the other thing is kind of a dirty secret, which you may not agree with is that fundamentally barack obama's pretty conservative. he really is. he's an eisenhower conservative. he's not a liberal. i mean, he's -- and i think that's one of the problems with the democratic party is they're looking for leadership to a guy on an issue like why aren't we creating jobs? why isn't there more aggregate demand in the economy? and it's because their guy doesn't really want it. >> i agree 100%. i mean, obama has been -- i'm alw
by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu. newman's own foundation. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their expertise in global finance to guide you through the business strategies and opportunities of international commerce. we put our extended global network to work for a wide range of companies, from small businesses to major corporations. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presented by kcet los angeles. presented by kcet los angeles. - hi, neighbour! wanna play in the block corner at school with me? and then we're going to miss elaina's house for backwards day. i'm so glad you're coming too. i'll be right backwards-- i mean back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through
, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions and the a wide range of industries -- in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was - get ready to blast off, neighbour. today we're going to play outer space at our friend miss elaina's house. and then we're going to play at prince wednesday's royal castle. i'm so happy you're my friend. ugga-mugga. be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributi
in union with the creator or with the animating intelligence of the universe, and then they are not here anymore. the rest of us, you and me, exhibit a and b, we are slogging around. we get summer spiritually and we hear the voice of "the new york times," like, ooh. then i have to have an awakening. i will get to the point of pain that i finally stopped hitting the snooze button and i go, we're starting over. that is what my faith gives me. i get to start my new 24 hours. whatever time it is, i don't even know what day it is, but at that time, right now, this minute, we're starting over. there is presence and union. we are looking into something so much bigger than our individual egos or destinies' or careers. it is great that we can disseminate information and truth and carry it to people. that is the kind of water we give thirsty people sometimes with what we have figured out. only god will fill that hole. only love, only spirit. you get tired of being half here. always in the future, what is going to happen? there are lots of tools spiritually that people can use. if i wear a gratitud
. and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry you operate in, helping to provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise in a wide range of solutions. what can we do for you? hi, neighbor! we're going to pick vegetables from our school garden. and then miss elaina's coming over for dinner. i'm excited to be with you, and i'll be right back. is made possible in part by... the richard king mellon foundation. dedicated for over sixty years to south western pennsylvania's quality of life, and competitive future. and by these pittsburg foundations. working together to enhance and enrich the lives of children for more than seventy-five years. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighborhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbor ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine?
represented by the longshoremen's union and the u.s. maritime alliance are close to finalizing a new labor deal. so close, that they've extended the deadline on negotiations by another 30 days. this heads off a strike that could have begun on sunday, crippling 14 important ports. the possibility of a strike worried retailers, manufacturers, and farmers, and risked losses in the billions. >> susie: our next guest says once the fiscal cliff mess is resolved, there will be an explosion of mergers and acquisitions in 2013. he's robert profusek, chairman of the global m&a practice at jones day. so bob why you are so up beat about more mergers and being a acquisitions especially with everything going on with the fiscal cliff. >> it's a pessimistic time andtn the merger market. m & a has been fantastic. 9 market has been okay. it's not been at th terrible bus been good. it's been held back by the negativism that was focused on the eu and this year it's the fiscal cliff and the election and everything else. the conditions are there. we need more m. & a in this cup. >> you are saying they are notgt
? >> the state of our union is getting stronger. and we've come too far to turn back now. >> if you're one of the more 250 million american who is already have health insurance, you will keep your health insurance. >> for me personally, it is important for me to go ahead and affirm that i think same sex couples should be able to get married. >> i cannot thank the president enough for his personal concern and col passion for our state and the people of our state. >> we're going to have to take more meaningful action to prevent more acts like this regardless of the politics. gwen: how evolved is he now, michael? >> well, you know, getting re-elected changes every president. barack obama will be changed by his election as well the question is whether for good or if ill? when you get re-elected, you come back. you've been reaffirmed. the public loves you even by three points an you start dreaming big. you don't have to worry about the polls. it's clear obama wants to go in that direction. he's talking about this big -- doing a fiscal solution whether now or later some time this year. he's talk
a bill prohibiting unions from requiring employees to join and pay dues. the move would make michigan, one of the most union-friendly states, the 24th "right to work" state, where union dues are voluntary. >> tom: more bumpy skies for boeing's 787 dreamliner. boeing's much anticipated and high-profile plane was grounded last week, according to "the new york times." the federal aviation administration also has ordered that fuel line connectors on all 787s be inspected. analysts call these problems minor hiccups. but as sylvia hall reports, the dreamliner's profitability to boeing right now is raising bigger concerns. >> reporter: boeing's 787 dreamliner promises to use about 20% less fuel than other planes. that's a big deal for an airline industry struggling with fuel costs. so far, boeing's sold more than 800 of its dreamliners, but the project has been plagued with three years of costly production delays. the company is ramping up production on the planes, but some analysts don't expect the company to see a profit from the line until at least 2020. the reason? the dreamliners are pr
have restricted union political contributions, that had some union money behind it, and also a lot of organizations like voto latino, like mi familia, civic groups that are looking at engaging voters who are in many cases not regular voters and have been written off as we can't depend on them. and there was real grassroots energy that got them out. i think college students were a big part of the win for prop 30. the fact that the current year's budget was built assuming that 30 was going to pass and that if it didn't, there were going to be trigger cuts that were going to cut into the higher education budget, really motivated a lot of students out. so, brown moves forward with that momentum. >> i really feel like that's kind of the nub of it. there was a huge component of fear involved, and well-based fear involved in the prop 30 campaign. it seemed like it finally got through to people that a tremendous percentage of the state budget is dedicated to k-12 and higher education and you can only cut so far, and we had come to that point without impacting those sections of the budget.
for its nightlife and its beautiful women. under the old soviet union, it was a center of organized crime. now odessa has become a major hub for the global sex trade. women are lured to the port of odessa from all over the struggling countries of eastern europe with promises of badly- needed work abroad. many are unaware of what the traffickers have in store. the production team has set up cameras here. >> we knew that if we wanted to get inside the story that we had to be in a place where it was so prevalent that everybody would have an example or know people who were trafficked. and that's what brought us ultimately to odessa. >> narrator: frustrated with an inability to chase the traffickers overseas, the ukrainian secret service has given us a tip about a suspected sex trader who regularly brings girls through here. across from the port, on the famous odessa steps, we secretly film as she traffics young women to turkey. we've been asked to call her olga. >> the secret service said that she runs a legitimate business as a cover, and she basically takes women from moldova and ukraine to
of cooperation between the district and the teachers' union in planning for the common core implementation. >> as contentious as our relationship has been, the one place that we totally agree is on how to figure out instructional delivery. >> reporter: but the good feeling between the union and the district breaks down when it comes to how students will be evaluated. beginning in 2014-15 school year a new assessment test will replace the current state test. the results could be shocking. >> the reality is we're actually going to see a drop-off. we're close to around 70% of students at proficient on the illinois test right now. predictions show that we may drop to somewhere in the teens. in terms of proficiency. that's chicago. but that's going to be a trend we're going to see across the country. the standards are that much more rigorous. >> reporter: the union is concerned that a dramatic drop in test scores could have a disastrous impact for teachers who will be evaluated on student performance. >> everyone will be judged and possibly very harshly. what we're really concerned about is tha
a different decision al type structure. >> yes. >> rose: from russia, and the soviet union from going into europe once again, deterrence is mutually assured destruction. and so then, does the question of value and life, different because of a culture that can produce suicide bombers mean that there -- means that will not work in the end or do you say no nationable and the leadership of no nation would ever, ever bargain initiate an action that assured their own destruction? >> well, one thing about the iranian leaders that they have in common with the leaders of terrorist groups like bin laden, they are not strapping on the suicide bombs, they are very willing to see young people and handicapped people and so on strap these things on, but their lives mean a lot to them, and that is something in our hip pocket it seems to me. they want to stay alive and they want to stay in power. >> rose: i want to talk about that. one quick question about what you believe with respect to iran. you believe that an attack by rael will be a terrible thing to happen, because it would only delay the inevi
21 points to close at 2,992. the european union came a step closer to a full-fledged banking union today. after an all-night meeting in brussels, e.u. finance ministers agreed to give the european central bank oversight of eurozone banks, as well as banks in other e.u. countries that choose to opt-in. the european commissioner for economic and monetary affairs said the agreement was an important step forward for europe. >> last night's decision on the single supervisory mechanism for euro area banks is a breakthrough towards a true banking union, which is significant and crucial in order to restore and reinforce confidence in the european economy. >> sreenivasan: the banking superviser role must be approved by the european parliament, but the position could be up and running by march of next year. separately, finance ministers agreed to give greece its next bailout payment of $64 billion. in return, greece has agreed to reduce its debt load by buying back devalued bonds from private investors. the european court of human rights issued a landmark ruling today condemning the c.i.a.'s
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 102 (some duplicates have been removed)